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import-bot (20211) [Avatar] Offline
#1
[Originally posted by morbus]

Just finished your book tonight. All in all, money well spent. Here is my
final list of errata (or so I think), as well as final impressions. Most of the
errata below are pretty minor things - I'm not picking on you, or making
slantss toward the quality of the book. I'm just anal and I notice this crap.
(Need a proofreader on your next book? ;>smilie...

pg. 112-113: examples show a delimiter of "
%%
", but the line by line
descriptions mention only "%%
".

pg. 139, second full para: I'm confused on to which is the correct binary
number for 123. Initially, you make it seem like a string of three binary
numbers (third line in the para), but then you go on to say (second to last
line in the para) that this single binary number represents 123. If this is an
error in my logic/understanding, then explain it a bit more clearer for me, if
you can. I just kinda shook my head on where you were going.

pg. 166: In your HTML example, you start off using OL, but end with UL.

pg. 218: You reprint the data file for your CDs, and reference "6 Records"
as your footer. But in your grammer rules, you use 'CDs' and not 'Records'
within the footer rule.

pg. 234: In the description of DBI->trace, you just come out of the blue and
tell how to download modules from CPAN. Doesn't seem to fit in.

pg. 242: In your description of ParseDateString, you mention ["two weeks"
on Friday]. I think you meant to say ["two weeks on Friday"].

pg. 266: Second code example, last statement doesn't end with a
semi-colon.

And now my final comments. Overall, I found the book pretty damn good.
The masterfully bad thing about is that it's too short. When I got the book
direct from Manning, my first remark was "man, this is kinda thin". After
finishing, I want more, more, more...

I found "3.1 Sorting" pretty interesting - I had never heard of Orcish (at
least, by that name), and your explanation of Schwartzian cleared up
some nagging "but..."'s that had popped in there from other readings.

Probably the "gee whiz shebang!" part of the book for me was your
description on reading and parsing PNG files. When people send me
weird stuff that I don't know what it is, I normally open the blasted things in
a text editor and look for clues to it's creator - I suspected, but never had
an inkling, that the other junk in the header was more useful and
descriptive.

The thing that bugged me about your XML chapters was that you didn't
touch on XML::Simple at all, which is by far, my favorite module for reading
in XML. I love it to death - I thought the description about RSS was good,
but you can do RSS just as simply with XML::Simple and with more
flexibility - I made the same decision a few weeks ago for one of my latest
projects. The only negative to XML::Simple is it's weak XML writing
abilities, but that's not what it was really meant for in the first place.

Another less gee-whiz in the book was your Parse::RecDescent chapter.
This module just reeks of fun fun fun - I can't wait to find some time and try
it (under the guise of "having a purpose").

All in all, a good book. Thanks for writing it.
import-bot (20211) [Avatar] Offline
#2
Re: Final Errata and Comments
[Originally posted by morbus]

Errata to my Errata <g>: Looks like the forums parse out the "slash n"
characters that normally denote a new line. As such, the first errata above
should have some of those in it.
import-bot (20211) [Avatar] Offline
#3
Re: Final Errata and Comments
[Originally posted by dave]

> Just finished your book tonight. All in all, money well spent. Here is my
> final list of errata (or so I think), as well as final impressions. Most of
the
> errata below are pretty minor things - I'm not picking on you, or making
> slantss toward the quality of the book. I'm just anal and I notice this crap.
> (Need a proofreader on your next book? ;>smilie...

Maybe smilie Or perhaps on a second edition of this one!

> pg. 112-113: examples show a delimiter of "
> %%
> ", but the line by line
> descriptions mention only "%%
> ".

Yes. You're right.

> pg. 139, second full para: I'm confused on to which is the correct binary
> number for 123. Initially, you make it seem like a string of three binary
> numbers (third line in the para), but then you go on to say (second to last
> line in the para) that this single binary number represents 123. If this is
an
> error in my logic/understanding, then explain it a bit more clearer for me,
if
> you can. I just kinda shook my head on where you were going.

I'm trying (!) to explain the different between ASCII and binary
representations of numbers. The first (longer) representation takes the ASCII
codes for '1', '2', and '3' and converts them to a binary number. The second
simply converts 123 to a binary number. The second version is much shorter.

> pg. 166: In your HTML example, you start off using OL, but end with UL.

Yes. That's wrong.

> pg. 218: You reprint the data file for your CDs, and reference "6 Records"
> as your footer. But in your grammer rules, you use 'CDs' and not 'Records'
> within the footer rule.

That's wrong too.

> pg. 234: In the description of DBI->trace, you just come out of the blue and
> tell how to download modules from CPAN. Doesn't seem to fit in.

Hmm... not at all sure what that's doing there. It should probably be removed.

> pg. 242: In your description of ParseDateString, you mention ["two weeks"
> on Friday]. I think you meant to say ["two weeks on Friday"].

You're right.

> pg. 266: Second code example, last statement doesn't end with a
> semi-colon.

And, once more, you're right.

> And now my final comments. Overall, I found the book pretty damn good.
> The masterfully bad thing about is that it's too short. When I got the book
> direct from Manning, my first remark was "man, this is kinda thin". After
> finishing, I want more, more, more...

That's exactly the kind of thing that an author wants to hear. What other
subjects would you have liked to see in the book?

[ ... ]

> The thing that bugged me about your XML chapters was that you didn't
> touch on XML::Simple at all, which is by far, my favorite module for reading
> in XML. I love it to death - I thought the description about RSS was good,
> but you can do RSS just as simply with XML::Simple and with more
> flexibility - I made the same decision a few weeks ago for one of my latest
> projects. The only negative to XML::Simple is it's weak XML writing
> abilities, but that's not what it was really meant for in the first place.

To be honest, I hadn't really used XML::Simple when I was writing that
chapter. I have now and I like it. I would definitely mention it if I was
writing that chapter now. I do have some issues with XML::Simple tho. It seems
I can never be 100% sure of the data structure that any given XML file will
produce. A small change in the XML will convert an array to a hash (or vice
versa). I like to us the XML:smiliearser Tree style for that kind of work as I
find the data structure easier to understand.

> Another less gee-whiz in the book was your Parse::RecDescent chapter.
> This module just reeks of fun fun fun - I can't wait to find some time and
try
> it (under the guise of "having a purpose"smilie.

Parse::RecDescent _is_ a fun module. If you ever get the chance you should get
along to see Damian Conway giving a class in it.

> All in all, a good book. Thanks for writing it.

Thanks very much for all of your comments.

Dave...