Juan Picado (18) [Avatar] Offline
#1
I wonder which programming language are you gonna use in this book. I haven't found any reference to his in the free chapter.
241356 (2) [Avatar] Offline
#2
I would be interested to find this out, too.
fr4nk (14) [Avatar] Offline
#3
I'd like to know this as well. I'm guessing it won't be C# or Java, since manning already have "microservices in .net" and "microservices in java" books.
v8 (4) [Avatar] Offline
#4
Dear authors,

Knowing the programming language(s) used in this book can be a decision factor to some readers.

Besides this, currently there is a promotion that ends on Tuesday, June 6 (2017-06-06): 50% off using code mldavies2lt. So, can we get an answer until then?

Thanks.
Morgan Bruce (2) [Avatar] Offline
#5
Hi all, we'll be using Python for later examples in the book.

Our aim is for the book to be valuable for engineers building microservices in any language, so while the examples will be in Python, we hope they'll be clear, succinct and valuable, even if it's not your weapon of choice.
vyurik (62) [Avatar] Offline
#6
It's odd and strange to use Python as Microservices language, while Java is dominant language of enterprise Microservices development.

Vitaly
Paulo A Pereira (1) [Avatar] Offline
#7
Hi all,

Our choice of language was aimed at something that could be easily understood by a larger audience.

In my case I work on Ruby and Elixir services on a daily basis (Python is also widely used by some of our teams). IMHO the language itself is not a key factor as one of the main benefits of microservices is to be able to use the best tool for the job. The principles we cover should apply no matter what is the language(s) you choose in the end.