428149 (29) [Avatar] Offline
#1
On p.143 the author mentions a very minor bug, in which three-column pages designed using Flexbox might transiently show two columns. This is barely noticeable, except on slow, older browsers.

Bizarrely, he suggests (or rather, quotes somebody else's suggestion) that readers use Grid instead of Flexbox to render the page in order to avoid this. But this makes no sense: why would one replace a technique such as Flexbox, which is well-supported, for Grid, which fails completely in 64% of browsers?
Jeremy Wagner (15) [Avatar] Offline
#2
Early March:

An entire chapter is devoted to Grid Layout: at present, only 0.3% of browsers support this properly, so it will start to become usable in around 2027.


According to this informal online survey, the overwhelming majority of web designers agree with me that Grid Layout will be unusable until 99% of users' browsers support it. That will be in around 2027.


Yesterday:
Replacing usable Flexbox with unusable Grid: 64% of browsers will break


Seems like the trend is moving pretty quickly on this. Chrome 57 hasn't come close to hitting peak usage yet, but when it (and versions after it) do, we're looking at majority support within the year. And not a simple majority of users. Enough that we can fall back to a simpler, mobile layout for users that don't support grid, and progressively enhance for those that do. Edge is now officially on board for implementing. This deserves to be covered as a primary subject in the manuscript.
428149 (29) [Avatar] Offline
#3
>>Seems like the trend is moving pretty quickly on this. Chrome 57 hasn't come close to hitting peak usage yet, but when it (and versions after it) do, we're looking at majority support within the year. And not a simple majority of users. Enough that we can fall back to a simpler, mobile layout for users that don't support grid, and progressively enhance for those that do. Edge is now officially on board for implementing. This deserves to be covered as a primary subject in the manuscript.

You can't use a feature which fails on most browsers. Nor does it make sense to create two entirely separate designs for each and every device. This *makes no sense*.

>> This deserves to be covered as a primary subject in the manuscript.

Obviously not, since it's a peripheral technique that *can't be used yet*.

If he wants to write a book which is slammed by readers the moment it gets onto Amazon, let him go ahead. People will be paying top dollars for this book ($70 in Canada) and will expect it to cover what they need to understand. They will *not* be happy if, following this book's advice, they produce websites which break. This is a pity: his writing is generally good. If he had the humility to accept feedback there would be the potential for this to be a great book.

Keith J Grant (30) [Avatar] Offline
#4
Grid layout was designed with progressive enhancement in mind. In Chapter 6, I walk you through using progressive enhancement to enable grid layouts for browsers that support it, while also defining fallback layouts for those that don’t. This way, while browser support continues to ramp up, users of browsers old and new will get a good user experience on your page. Using progressive enhancement, the page won’t “break” for anyone.