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28527 (2) [Avatar] Offline
#1
You use some baseball analogies for examples, for those of us who do not follow baseball I found one term somewhat confusing -

'sports stats like win/loss record or average number of toes'

What stat does 'toes' represent ?
Andrew Betts (15) [Avatar] Offline
#2
I am pretty sure "average number of toes" is just a joke as some kind of data point that could be used.
28527 (2) [Avatar] Offline
#3
Thanks, I suspected as much after further reading (specifically the comment on zero toes).
281420 (2) [Avatar] Offline
#4
Went to this forum for the same reason. If it's not a joke but some baseball term - you should explain it. Because if you mean "toes" that are fingers on the legs - than 8.5 is quite strange.
Andrew Betts (15) [Avatar] Offline
#5
It is not horribly uncommon for someone to have toes partially for fully amputated for some reason. If you're averaging the number of toes of 20 baseball players it could be possible everyone is missing a toe or two.
15166 (2) [Avatar] Offline
#6
Guys, this is strictly humor.

Your toes are intimately involved in controlling balance while running; a professional athlete missing one or two cannot sprint or pivot at the exalted pace expected of baseball.

Cheers!
rbramley (2) [Avatar] Offline
#7
Agree that it needs clarifying as it's easy to misinterpret it as an obscure stat given the introduction of "such as sports stats like...".

https://www.slideshare.net/ManningBooks/how-do-neural-networks-make-predictions-73138393 qualifies it:
"This network takes in one datapoint at a time (average number of toes -on the players’ feet- on the baseball team)"