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447641 (3) [Avatar] Offline
#1
This book consists of over 100 techniques which are specific to the work of IT administrators.

This book has literally a few sentences about Docker in the context of continuous integration, continuous delivery, Lean, Agile, test automation, software quality assurance, etc.

For readers coming from a management, development or quality assurance background, I warmly recommend finding the answers to the WHAT, WHY, HOW and WHEN of Docker in Practice in the book 'API-Driven DevOps - Strategies for Continuous Deployment'
aidanhs (25) [Avatar] Offline
#2
447641 wrote:This book consists of over 100 techniques which are specific to the work of IT administrators.

This book has literally a few sentences about Docker in the context of continuous integration, continuous delivery, Lean, Agile, test automation, software quality assurance, etc.

For readers coming from a management, development or quality assurance background, I warmly recommend finding the answers to the WHAT, WHY, HOW and WHEN of Docker in Practice in the book 'API-Driven DevOps - Strategies for Continuous Deployment'


Hi, thanks for getting in touch!

First off, I note that your account has posted two messages in total - identical complaints for both Docker in Action and Docker in Practice without any specific points about either of the books and redirecting to another, surprises me a little - if you've taken the time to read both, I might expect a little more substance when recommending one book over another? However, I'll put this aside and talk a little about Docker in Practice to respond to your post.

Some background: when Ian and I sat down to write the book, it was with the experience of using Docker as a typical software tool. By this I mean we'd encountered bugs, worked around them, put it to use in ways the creator probably never anticipated, all with the goal of making software development more productive. In the end, 'pure' ops only exists to facilitate software, and devops is an attempt at moving ops closer to the developer in an attempt to make things 'better' (for whatever definition of better you choose). The thing is, no matter how good Docker is, developers need to do some ops to do devops - it's in the name! If a developer point-blank refuses to learn any ops at all they'll probably end up with a 2GB image that's then a complete pain to do anything with - I've seen it happen before. So it may be that the 'ops' stuff you see is actually the knowledge you need to make optimal use of Docker, given that you're a developer who may not have dipped into this world before.

This said, we're always interested in what kind of things our readers would want to learn about, so I took a look at the table of contents for "API-Driven DevOps - Strategies for Continuous Deployment". Below are the three chapters specifically about Docker:

*Introducing Docker Containers*
What is Docker?
Why Docker?
Simple Docker Commands
Caveat Emptor
Analysis: Use Docker in the Right Scenario

*Digging into Docker Architecture*
Virtual Containers
Docker Architecture
Who uses Docker?
Where does Docker fit in the DevOps puzzle?
Up Next: Tooling Built on Docker Remote API

*Tools Built on Top of the Docker API*
Dogfooding
Scheduling
Cluster Management
Service Discovery
Networking
Storage
Continuous Integration
Hosted Docker Registries
Log Aggregation
Monitoring
Configuration Management
Security Auditing
PaaS
Full-blown OS
Analysis: Remote Docker API Demonstrates Automated DevOps in Action


Chapter 1 above looks equivalent to the chapter 1 of DiP. The chapter 2 above looks similar to our chapter 2 of DiP, with a tiny taste of chapter 8/9. And then chapter 3 above is apprently equivalent to chapter 5 (configuration management)/6 (continuous integration)/7 (continuous delivery)/8 (networking)/9 (orchestration)/10 (security)/11 (docker in production ops) in DiP. (there do not seem to be any equivalents for chapter 3 (docker as a lightweight VM)/4 (day to day docker)/12 (docker in production difficulties) in DiP)

There are a few notes of interest here. First, the table of contents apparently touches on a number of the 'ops' things, like logging, monitoring and security - weren't you unhappy about the presence of these in DiP? Second, it's difficult to tell from the somewhat vague table of contents, but I'm not sure how much depth this book goes into on each topic. 'Security auditing' is present as a whole chapter in DiP, covering much more than just auditing. Likewise for 'Networking' - we talk about the built in virtual Docker network, as well as ways to manipulate it and finish with network plugins. Of particular interest to me is 'Scheduling', 'Cluster Management' and 'Paas' - I assume this is tackling the subject of orchestration, but I have very little idea if it looks at Kubernetes, Mesos, Openshift or others (and whether it describes setting them up, or just how they might be used)!

If you happen to come back, it'd be great if you could identify specific things you think are present in the API-Driven devops book, but are missing from DiP and should be present in a book looking in depth at applying Docker to get things done (which we hope is what DiP is) - no book is perfect!

Aidan
447641 (3) [Avatar] Offline
#3
Hi. I apologize for posting the same complaint on the two books 'Docker in Action' and 'Docker in Practice'. I posted on the forum for the first book by mistake.

I've worked as Agile Consultant - the person that helps gets Ops and Dev together.

I've spent the last six months diving into the DevOps expertise out there, including some five weeks spent reading 'Docker in Practice'. It's really that simple: this is a book strictly for IT administrators. It's a great book for IT administrators, never the less it is still strictly for IT administrators.

Any book's title sets expectations. You should really rewrite the title to 'Docker in Practice for IT administrators'.
I gave five weeks of my time to read your book and the information from it that I could apply IN PRACTICE as an Agile Consultant or Lead Developer I could have gotten in a couple of hours from Docker's web site or from blogs.
Any book's title really sets expectations, this is also why you have a 'Very dissapointed' review on Amazon.

I think it is a big mistake to consider expanding your audience. Targeting consultants or developers will decrease the admirable expertise you share with IT administrators. And it's really best to serve one audience group very, very well, instead of serving poorly several audience groups.