Christoffer (6) [Avatar] Offline
#1
I'm reading through the book now and got stuck on the first paragraph in chapter "3.1 Bus factors".

A bus factor can be defined this way: the number of people who need to get hit by a bus for
the project or team to stop functioning. Therefore, a bus factor of one is the riskiest.
If you’ve worked in the software industry for any length of time, ask yourself, “Do I know a
person in my project who, if they disappeared tomorrow, would leave the project or team
would stuck?” It's unlikely you can provide multiple names. [...] Many companies have multiple “Yuri”s.


The whole section from "Do I know [...]" seems to contradict itself. Here is what I assume it should say, including my changes:

A bus factor can be defined this way: the number of people who need to get hit by a bus for
the project or team to stop functioning. Therefore, a bus factor of one is the riskiest.
If you’ve worked in the software industry for any length of time, ask yourself, “Do I know a
person in my project who, if they disappeared tomorrow or left the project the team
would get stuck?” It's likely you can provide multiple names.


I'm not native English speaking so I might be reading the section completely wrong and maybe my experience is completely different from others but I do see living "bus factors" every day in various projects, it is very likely from my perspective that most software engineers can provide multiple names.
RoyOsherove (82) [Avatar] Offline
#2
yep, you're right!