Anonymous (122) [Avatar]
#1
I've already learned a lot from the first two chapters of this book (and some of Doug's blog posts), and I can't wait for the remaining chapters to be written/released.

It seems to be pitched perfectly for my own circumstances. I'm a designer, and I've been working on a side project (which I'd love to turn into a full-time thing) with a developer who is new to Solr. I am reliant upon him to make anything happen, but because neither of us have a formal foundation in search we don't have sufficient common ground and language to work together particularly effectively.

I've found most other resources impenetrable because they focus on the technical implementation of Solr, without sufficient discussion of broader roles, but on the basis of what I've read so far I think this will be the perfect resource for us.

Basically I wish this book was already released, but I'm wondering if anybody can point to something similar which might tide us over until it is?
Myke (5) [Avatar] Offline
#2
(Was logged out whilst writing this post. It's mine.)
Doug Turnbull (15) [Avatar] Offline
#3
Hey! Thanks for the feedback.

I would definitely encourage you to read Introduction to Information Retrieval
http://www-nlp.stanford.edu/IR-book/

Its the kind of book you'd read if you were going to *build* a search engine smilie It's a very good CS textbook, and won't be nearly as applied as this book. However, it's one of those books that can give you a lot of aha moments about the algorithms.

Also do keep a continued eye out on the OpenSource Connections blog, I'm sure as ideas come to me while writing I'll be blogging as well:
http://opensourceconnections.com/blog

Cheers!
Myke (5) [Avatar] Offline
#4
Doug Turnbull wrote:
I would definitely encourage you to read Introduction to Information Retrieval
http://www-nlp.stanford.edu/IR-book/

Its the kind of book you'd read if you were going to *build* a search engine smilie It's a very good CS textbook, and won't be nearly as applied as this book. However, it's one of those books that can give you a lot of aha moments about the algorithms.

Thanks Doug. I have watched the videos from Manning and Dan Jurafsky's Stanford Natural Language Processing course. I was mostly able to follow Manning's videos, whereas much of the time Jurafsky's assumed to much knowledge for this non-computer scientist to keep up (which is obviously not a criticism given the intended audience). It would be interesting exercise to revisit them after reading your completed book.

Hopefully the IR textbook will be written and structured in a way that I can follow enough of it to recognise the aha moments.

Also do keep a continued eye out on the OpenSource Connections blog, I'm sure as ideas come to me while writing I'll be blogging as well:
http://opensourceconnections.com/blog

Yep, I've already got an alert set up for any updates. It's perfectly pitched to my level of understanding. (Obviously I don't want to be able to build a search engine from scratch, but a better understanding of how Solr is does its magic will help me immeasurably when we're trying to optimise our database and search results).