jean-baptiste (8) [Avatar] Offline
#1
Hello,
In my point of view, some informations are missing from the 9.4.1 chapter. Informations which could be usefull to try the weather application on our computers. For instance, you talk about the adaptation of the data collection script, but you don't give it's listing. Is it available for download ? Is it possible to excecute the script from Callimachus ? Is the entire structure of the weather application available for download ? You also refer to the Callimachus REST API, but an example would be welcome.

What is more, I found a bit disapointing not to find an example of online data exploitation. If the purpose of the book is to talk about using and making available data on the web, I find strange to have to download XML, TXT and CSV files to use the data smilie Why don't you give an example of DBPedia data retrieval, for instance ?

Thanks,
david.wood (45) [Avatar] Offline
#2
Re: Code for the 9.4 chapter application
Hi Jean-Baptiste,

Thanks for your comments. I think you are right that we should have made more specific mention of the changes in the data collection script originally presented in section 7.3.2 in Listing 7.5. Unfortunately, the book is currently in print production, so we will need to check with Manning to see whether we can change section 9.4.1 before the book goes to print. If not, we can include it as errata.

It is our intention to make all of our source code available from http://linkeddatadeveloper.com, but that site is not yet up.

However, I am surprised about your DBpedia comments. DBpedia references appear on 60 pages (out of 26smilie in the book and the first instructions regarding the access of live data from DBpedia occurs in the first chapter. Most of the first eight chapters use only live RDF accessed over the Web. The reason that we showed some conversion examples in chapters 8 and 9 is because most real-world data is not already in RDF. We thought it would be both helpful to acknowledge that and to show some examples that included conversions.

I hope this helps.

Regards,
Dave