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andylowry (5) [Avatar] Offline
#1
First sentence: "The OSGi Service Platform is comprised of two parts:..." has a very common usage error. It's either "is composed of" or "comprises" but not "is comprised of."
andylowry (5) [Avatar] Offline
#2
Re: Section 1.2 usage error
Same error again in the very next paragraph! smilie Probably best to search for "comprise" throughout the manuscript.
andylowry (5) [Avatar] Offline
#3
Re: Section 1.2 usage error
Another, less obvious case of the same error in section 1.2.1: "...logical models that combine to comprise a given application." The word "comprise" means "to be composed of" - it's essentially the opposite of one sense of "compose." It's the application that "comprises" the modules, not the other way around. You'd be better off with "compose" or "form" or "make up" instead of "comprise" here.
richard.hall (87) [Avatar] Offline
#4
Re: Section 1.2 usage error
Thanks. I will edit its usage.
andylowry (5) [Avatar] Offline
#5
Re: Section 1.2 usage error
Well, after pointing out the same "error" three times I finally got nervous enough to check my facts. Webster.com says:

usage: Although it has been in use since the late 18th century, sense 3 is still attacked as wrong. Why it has been singled out is not clear, but until comparatively recent times it was found chiefly in scientific or technical writing rather than belles lettres. Our current evidence shows a slight shift in usage: sense 3 is somewhat more frequent in recent literary use than the earlier senses. You should be aware, however, that if you use sense 3 you may be subject to criticism for doing so, and you may want to choose a safer synonym such as compose or make up.

"Sense 3" referred to above is one in which "comprise" is a synonym for "compose" or "constitute." So apologies for my inaccurate "corrections..." But as the usage note points out, there are many who, like me (until just now), will view this as a usage error and react allergically to it. So the "safer synonym" advice might be worth considering.